Food Distribution Initiatives
2020-present

We believe sustainable access to food is not only imperative for
health and well-being but is a human right.

Fall/Winter 2020

When COVID-19 resulted in food access challenges for some communities, GMCC partnered with faith and community leaders to launch a food distribution initiative. We opened a kitchen and prepared and delivered daily, culturally appropriate nutritious meals to seven Twin Cities communities. By the end of 2020, we were delivering 7,000 meals per week. This initiative inspired our reputation as one of the only effective halal food distribution networks in the area. Additionally, we worked with mosques and other partners to provide take home food and supply boxes for 150 families.

Pop Up Food Shelf and Meal Distribution – Fall/Winter 2021

In continued commitment to the concept of “full family support”, with funding from Hennepin County, we continue to feed our communities with prepared meals and take home food boxes that contain healthy perishable and non-perishable food items. Our food distribution efforts in fall/winter 2021 included: meals and food bags for the families of youth who participated in our fall Genius Labs and Tech Teens programming; a pop-up food shelf through which we distribute food to anyone who needs it; and the distribution of food through partner faith communities and those living in our immediate neighborhoods.

Specifically, we provided 1,412 nutritious prepared meals to our neighbors and constituent families and served 713 families and neighbors with food bags that included 8,000 pounds of fresh produce, meat, and non-perishables

Iftar Meals – Spring 2022

GMCC and Executive Director of West Bank Athletic Club, Coach Ahmed, are currently partnering to bring hot culturally appropriate prepared meals to Masjid Rawdah (Somali Cultural Institute) each Saturday of Ramadan (April 2 – May 1, 2022).

What is Ramadan? For the Muslim and Islam community, Ramadan is a holy month of fasting, introspection and prayer. It is celebrated as the month during which the profit Muhammad received the initial revelations of the Quran, the holy book for Muslims. Additionally, fasting is one of the five fundamental principles of Islam. Each day during Ramadan, Muslims do not eat or drink from dawn to sunset. 

What is iftar? After the sunset prayer, communities, families, and friends gather in their homes or mosques to break their fast with a meal called ifṭār that is often shared with friends and extended family.

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